Courses taught in recent years:

1) The Political Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas,
2) Elements of Political Theory,
3) Classical Political Philosophy,
4) Christian and Medieval Political Thought,
5) The Political Philosophy of St. Augustine,
6) Contemporary Writers Interested in the Nature and History of Political Philosophy,
7) Plato's Political Philosophy,
8) Political Theory and Natural Law,
9) The Political Philosophy of Aristotle.

 

CLASS SYLLABI:

 

1) THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ST. THOMAS AQUINAS. Spring, 1998, Government Department, J. Schall, S. J., 143-487. Office, 657, ICC, tel. 7-4006 or 5903. Office Hours, 10-11 Mon.; 1:20-2:20 Wed., or by Appointment. E-mail -- schallsj@gusun.georgetown.edu -- Web Sites: www.moreC.com/schall and www.georgetown.edu/schall

 

1) This is a course designed for upper division undergraduate student. It will consist in a programmed reading and discussion of the significant texts of Thomas Aquinas on political philosophy. (This course is designed to follow a course on the Political Philosophy of Aristotle, though not required for this course).

 

2) Each student will be expected to write one term paper (two for graduate students) about 15-20 pages, footnoted, bibliographied, typed, proper academic form. Subject matter of each student's paper will be assigned shortly after the beginning of the semester by the professor. This paper is due the last day of class (that is, last day of class, not test).

 

3) Students will be expected to attend each class. Absence from class is itself sufficient for lower grades or failure. The student who takes this course is expected to agree to the discipline of regular class attendance after having read the assigned text for each class. Students who do not expect to fulfill this requirement are requested not to take the course.

 

4) The classes will be conducted generally in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to devote a reasonable amount of study for each day's class, to read the assigned matter before coming to class, to participate in the class on the basis of his reading. The student is thus expected so to discipline his daily study schedule to include at least two to three hours to each class.

 

5) The books required for the class are in the bookstore. The student will need to have these books. They are: 1) St. Thomas Aquinas, On Law, Morality, and Politics; 2) Kreeft, Summa of the Summa; 3) Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas; 4) Davies, The Thought of Thomas Aquinas; 5) Josef Pieper -- an Anthology; ; 6) Pieper, A Guide to St. Thomas; 7) Aquinas, Commentary on the Ethics of Aristotle; 8) Weisheipl, Friar San Thomas d'Aquino. Additional books will be on reserve shelf in library.

 

6) There will also be some books on reserve. Each student is also expected to read Part I plus Chapters 7, 14, and 21 of Schall, Another Sort of Learning, on reserve. The essays under #11, Aquinas, of the Schall Web Site should also be read.

 

7) "The Mystic is right in saying that the relation of God and Man is essentially a love-story; the pattern and type of all love-stories. The Dominican rationalist (Aquinas) is equally right in saying that the intellect is at home in the topmost heavens; and that the appetite for truth may outlast and even devour all duller appetites of man." -- G. K. Chesterton, St. Thomas Aqunas, p. 74.

 


 

2) ELEMENTS OF POLITICAL THEORY. -- Fall, 1998 - 143-117 - Govt. Department -- J. Schall, S. J. - Office: 657 ICC. Hrs.: Mon. 10 - 11; Wed. 1:20 - 2:20, by Appointment. Tel. 7-4006; 5903. E-mail -- schallsj@gusun.georgetown.edu -- Web Site: www.moreC.com/schall

 

1) A course designed for undergraduates in order to acquaint them with political philosophy (in contrast to constitutional, institutional, or area/national studies) as that discipline has been understood in ancient, medieval, and modern contexts.

 

2) Method: This course consists in a programmed reading of ten or so books by student and teacher, in which the student will be expected to come to each class having read regularly assigned sections of each book in order to gain a general and intelligent acquaintance with how the particular author thought about politics.

 

3) Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Students are expected to attend each class after having read the assigned matter. This attendance and participation will be the main factor in evaluating the performance of the student. Please, please do not take this course unless you are desirous to do this assigned work and regularly attend class on assigned days. Absence from class is a reason for a lowering of grades or failing. One of the assigned books is my Another Sort of Learning which contains a discussion of class, grades, student and teacher expectations. Each student should read this book privately the first half before midterm, the last half before end of semester.

 

4) A final examination will be given on the assigned day. One mid-term will be given on the last class day before Semester Break (Oct. 8) about the matter studied up to that date. Assigned texts or your class notes may be used in any test in this class.

 

5) One short, four-page, double-spaced, typed term paper will be expected on the last day of class. Subject matter is as follows: A statement of the contents of one chapter or section (student's selection) in Plato, Aristotle, Deane, or other assigned text about how the chapter relates to the whole book and its argument. Some outside reading on the topic will be expected, footnotes, and bibliography will be expected (N.B.).

 

6) Books: Plato, Great Dialogues; Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics; Schall, Politics of Heaven and Hell; Cicero, Selected Writings; Schall, Another Sort of Learning; Simon, General Theory of Authority; Schumacher, A Guide for the Perplexed; Deane, Political and Social Ideas of St. Augustine; Aquinas, Treatise on Law; Machiavelli, The Prince, Locke, Second Treatise; Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil. Titles are in the book store, which removes them early in October.

 

7) "The absence of romance in my history will, I fear, detract somewhat from its interest; but if it be judged useful by those inquirers who desire an exact knowledge of the past as an aid to the understanding of the future, which in the course of human things must resemble if it does not reflect it, I shall be content. In fine, I have written my work, not as an essay which is to win the applause of the moment, but as a possession for all time." -- Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, I, 21.

 


 

3) CLASSICAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY -- 143-449. MW 1:15-2:30. Office Hours: M 11-Noon, W 2:40-3:30, or by appointment. 657 ICC Tel. 74006, 7-6130. Fall, 1995.

 

1) This is a graduate/undergraduate course on Greek and Roman Political Philosophy.

 

2) Method: The course will consist in a programmed reading by student and teacher of some ten books, in which the student will be expected to read regularly assigned texts for each class. The student should try to keep a private journal or account of matter read. Dates, places, names are important.

 

3) The class will generally be conducted in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to attend class regularly (n.b., each class) and a major element (the major element) in his grade will be derived from this regular reading and attendance. Please do not sign up for this course unless you agree to follow these requirement.

 

4) One term paper (two for graduate students) of about fifteen pages, double-spaced, footnoted, bibliography, will be due on the last day of class. This paper should be about a subject in political philosophy based on one of the main authors or on a major idea, such as Roman theory of empire or Plato.

 

5) There will be a final examination on the subject matter of the course on the day assigned in the calendar. The student will be permitted to use assigned texts or class notes for this examination.

 

6) The books to be read are: Strauss, City and Man; Sophocles, Theban Plays; Thucydides, Peloponnesian War; Cicero, On the Good Life; Marcus Aurelius, Meditations; Aristotle, Politics; Plato, Gorgias, Last Days; Xenophon, Finlay, Politics in the Ancient World, Tacitus, Annals. Get books before middle of October or Book Store removes them. There will be a reserve list in library. Students are expected to read relevant chapters in Another Sort of Learning on teaching and learning.

 

7) "The decay of political philosophy into ideology reveals itself most obviously in the fact that in both research and teaching, political philosophy has been replaced by the history of political philosophy.... (This) is an absurdity: to replace political philosophy by the history of political philosophy means to replace a doctrine which claims to be true by a survey of more or less brilliant errors." -- Strauss, City and Man, p. 8.

 


 

4) CHRISTIAN AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. Govt. 143-448. Schall, Summer, 1998, Office 657, ICC, Hrs. M. 9:15-10; W. 1-2 pm, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006; 6130.

 

1) A course in Christian and Medieval Political. Theory, approximately Augustine to Machiavelli.

 

2) Method: This course will consist in a programmed reading of some ten books by student and teacher, in which the student will be expected to come to each class having read regularly assigned sections of each book in order to gain a general and intelligent acquaintance with the thought of this era.

 

3) Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Students are expected to attend each class after having read the assigned mater. This attendance and reading will be the main factor in evaluating the performance of the student. Please do NOT take this course unless you are willing to do this regular work and attend class on assigned days. Absence from class is itself a reason for a lowering of grades. (My Another Sort of Learning [on Reserve] discusses grades, purpose of class and study, please read if you have not). Students are expected to conduct themselves in an attentive and disciplined manner in each class.

 

4) A final examination on the matter read in class will be given on the assigned date in Schedule. Students will be able to use assigned texts or notes during this test. The test will be a straight forward, objective essay test. The student who regularly and carefully reads the assigned texts should have no problem with the test.

 

5) One fifteen-twenty page academic term paper -- bibliography, footnotes, proper academic form -- will be expected on the last day of class (not on day of test). The professor will assign the topic to each student in due course.

 

6) Books to be read (to be found in the bookstore, please purchase before middle of March when books are removed; students are expected to possess a copy of books and bring them to class) are: 1) Lerner, Medieval Political Philosophy, (Cornell), 2) Dawson, Medieval Essays, (Doubleday Image), 3) Thomas Aquinas (Baumgarth and Regan) On Law, Morality, and Politics (Hackett), 4) St. Augustine, (Kries, Fortiin) Political Writings (Hackett). Recommended: 1) Political Philosophy of St. Augustine, Gateway, 2) Pieper, A Guide to St. Thomas, 3) Pieper, Scholasticism, 4) Derrick, Rule of Peace, 5) Dawson, Religion and the Rise of Western Culture, 6) Adams, Mt. St. Michel and Chartres, 7) Rahner, Church and State in Early Middle Ages, 8) Cambridge History of Medieval Political Philosophy; Pirenne, Economic and Social History of Europe.

 

7) "The Middle Ages witnessed the first, and certainly the first adequate, discussion between these two most important forces of the Western world: the religion of the Bible and the science or philosophy of the Greeks." Leo Strauss, "How to Begin to Study Medieval Philosohy."

 


 

5) POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ST. AUGUSTINE, Govt 143-498, Spring, 1995, MW, Schall, Office, ICC, 657, Government Department, tel. 687-5903, 4006. Hours: M 11:40-12:30; W 11:40-12:30, by appointment.

 

1) This course will be a consideration of the Writings and Thought of St. Augustine particularly in so far as they refer to questions and issues of political philosophy.

 

2) The course will consist of a reading of a number of books of Augustine and about Augustine. Each student will be expected to attend each class, having read the assigned text for each class. Absence from class is itself cause for lower or not-passing grade. (Please read [on reserve, in book store] in Schall, "Another Sort of Learning," the two essays "What A Student Owes His Teacher" and "Grades"). A student who does not want seriously to commit himself to regular class attendance and reading is requested not to take this course.

 

3) These books will be found in the book store -- they are Stevenson, The Confessions, The City of God, Neuhaus, and Fortin. A number of books and essays on Augustine are on reserve, consult George. Numerous books and essays can be found in the library. Any problem consult professor. The literature by and about Augustine is vast. The student will be expected to have a general idea of Augustine's life and the period in which he lived, as well as of his subsequent influence.

 

4) Final examination on assigned day. The test will be straight-forward. Assigned books or notes can be used. Each student will is to present a researched, reflective essay on some aspect of the Political Thought of St. Augustine, topic assigned by professor. This paper (about 15 pp) should contain bibliography and footnotes, due the last day of class.

 

5) The classes will be in dialogue fashion. The student should come to each class having read the assigned text, but not worried that somehow he will be asked a question or that he may not know the answers. The purpose is not to frighten or unsettle but to learn and to come to see the fascination in St. Augustine.

 

6) "Augustine: 'What does it seem to you that we wish to accomplish when we speak?" Adeodatus: "As it occurs to me now, either to teach or to learn." Augustine: "I see, and I agree to one of these points. For it is evident that when we speak, we wish to teach. But how do we learn?" Adeodatus: "How indeed except by asking questions?" Augustine: "Even then, as I understand it, we only wish to teach. For, I ask, do you question for any other reason except that you may teach what you wish to him you question?" Adeodatus: "That is true."

-- Augustine, De Magistro, Chapter I.

 


  

 

6) CONTEMPORARY WRITERS INTERESTED IN THE NATURE AND HISTORY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. -- Gvt. 458 -- MWF -- Schall, Fall, 1998, Office, 657 ICC, Hrs. M 10-11; W 1-2, or by appointment, Tel. 7-4006/5903. Web site: www.moreC.com/schall

 

1) This is a course designed to enable the student to read several significant books of writers dealing with what political philosophy is about, especially from its classic origins. Emphasis this semester will be on reason and revelation theorie in politics.

 

2) There will be one fifteen-twenty page (for graduate students, two) term paper, as assigned by the professor, due last day of class. It should be properly footnoted, bibliographied, in academic form and style. There will be a final examination on the date in academic calendar.

 

3) Method: Each class will have a specific assignment. The student is expected to have read the assignment before attending class. The class will generally be conducted in dialogue form. Occasionally the student will be expected to present assigned material before the class. The major part of the grade consists in the regularity of class attendance, preparation, response. Each student is encouraged to read the materials on teaching, grading, and reading in Schall, Another Sort of Learning, which, along with other materials for course, is on the library reserve.

 

4) The books assigned (found in book store, please purchase before end of October as the book store removes them after that time) are the following: 1) Neuhaus, The End of Democracy (Spence), 2) Chesterton, Orthodoxy (Doubleday Image or Ignatius), 3) Strauss The Rebirth of Classical Political Rationalism, (Chicago) 4) David Walsh, After Ideology, (CUAPress), 5) A. MacIntyre, After Virtue, (Notre Dame), 6) Schall, At the Limits of Political Philosophy, (CUAPress), 7) S. Orr, Jerusalem and Athens (Rowman and Littlefield), 8) C. Pickstock, After Writing: The Liturgical Consummation of Philosophy (Blackwell's), 9) Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind (Simon and Schuster), 10) Manent, The City of Man (Princeton) .

 

5) Again, class attendance and preparation mandatory. Please do not take this course if you have problems with class attendance and preparation. The class requires a commitment of time for reading for each class in the student's daily or weekly schedule.

 

6) "The decay of political philosophy into ideology reveals itself most obviously in the fact that in both research and teaching, political philosophy has been replaced by the history of political philosophy. The substitution can be excused as a well-meaning attempt to prevent, or at least to delay, the burial of a great tradition. In fact it is not merely a half measure but an absurdity: to replace political philosophy by the history of political philosophy means to replace a doctrine which claims to be true by a survey of more or less brilliant errors." -- Leo Strauss, City and Man, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964), pp. 7-8.

 


 

7) PLATO'S POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY. Govt. 143-422. J. Schall, S. J., Summer, 1994; MT-Th, Office Hours -- before or after class, tel, 7-4006, or at student's convenience.

 

 

1) This class will consist in reading of the following books in class. The student is expected to possess a copy of each book and to have read the assigned text before the class.

 

 

The Apology, The Crito, The Phaedo, The Republic, The Gorgias, The Symposium, Voegelin, Plato, Strauss, The Rebirth of Classical Political Rationalism.

 

2) Class attendance is required. There are Fourteen Classes in this Summer School. Please do not miss class. Class attendance is a major part of Grades. The class will be conducted in a dialogue fashion. NB: read Schall, Another Sort of Learning, chapters "What A Student Owes His Teacher?" and "Grades," as well as the chapter, "On Teaching the Political Philosophy of Plato" (In book store or on reserve).

 

3) There are many studies on Plato in the library as well as texts of these and other Platonic works. The students should refer to these sources. There will also be a small reserve list at Reserve Shelf in Library.

 

4) Each student will be expected to do a fifteen page term paper, footnoted and bibliographied on Plato's Political Thought. The paper should show signs of reading and consideration of Platonic works or studies on them. This paper can be on any dialogue or topic and, if the student prefers, the professor will assign topic. This paper is due the last day of class.

 

5) The student is always free to consult the Professor on any item pertaining to class assignment or work.

 

6) There will be a test on the assigned day in the schedule.

 


 

8) POLITICAL THEORY AND NATURAL LAW. Spring, 1999. Gov't 142-485. J. Schall, S. J., Office, 657 ICC, Hrs, M 11-Noon; Wed. 2:40-3:30, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006, 5903. Class, MW, 1:15-2:30.

 

1) This course is designed for undergraduate students to acquaint them with the literature, tradition, and content of classical natural law discussions in political philosophy.

 

2) Method: The course is a programmed reading of some ten books by student and teacher. The student will be expected to come to each class having read the assigned material.

 

Classes are conducted in a dialogue fashion. Class attendance is required. Please do not take this course if regular class attendance and preparation is not possible or intended. The major element in grades consists in the persistency of regular reading and attendance. (See Schall, Another Sort of Learning, first section, for a description of what the instructor expects from the students -- on Reserve in Library or in bookstore).

 

3) A final test will be given on the assigned day in the bulletin on material read. Please expect to be at this test. There will be one term paper, due on the last day of class, fifteen or so pages, proper academic form, which means footnotes, adequate bibliography. The topic will be assigned by the instructor. Graduate students will be expected to do two papers. In all tests, all assigned books can be used.

 

4) Books: In the bookstore the following books should be available (there will also be books on reserve) -- please purchase before middle of October as book store removes them at that time. 1) Aquinas, Treatise on Law, 2) d'Entreves, The Natural Law; 3) Budziszewski, Written on the Heart: The Case for Natural Law, 4) Rice, Fifty Questions on Natural Law; 5) Finnis, Natural Law and Natural Right; 6) Simon, The Tradition of Natural Law; 7) Hittinger, A Critique of the New Natural Law Theory; 8) Maritain, Man and the State; 9) Arkes, Beyond the Constitution; 10) Rommen, Natural Law..

 

5) Thomas Aquinas: "To the natural law belongs everything to which a man is inclined according to his nature." (I-II, 94, 3).

 

6) Marcus Tullius Cicero: "True law is reason, right and natural, commanding people to fulfil their obligation and prohibiting and deterring them from doing wrong. Its validity is universal; it is immediate and eternal. Its commands and prohibitions apply effectively to good men, and those uninfluenced by them are bad. Any attempt to supersede this law, to repeal any part of it, is sinful; to cancel it entirely is impossible. Neither the Senate nor the Assembly can exempt us from its demands; we need no interpreter or expounder of it but ourselves. There will not be one law in Rome, one in Athens, or one now and one later, but all nations will be subject all the time to this one changeless and everlasting law." -- On the Commonwealth, III, 33.

 


 

9) THE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE. Government 143-456. Fall, 1997. Schall. Office: 657 ICC, Hours: Monday 10-11; Wednesday, 1:20-2:20, or by appointment. Tel. 7-4006, 6130, schallsj@gusun.georgetown.edu -- web: http://www.georgetown.edu/schall

 

1) This course is a study of the principal elements in Aristotle's political philosophy, including the place of politics in Aristotle's general theory. In addition to the Politics, we will read The Ethics, The Poetics, and passages from The Rhetoric, the works that Aristotle designates as practical science. One of the purposes of the course is to learn what is a practical science.

 

2) Method: This course will generally be conducted in a dialogue fashion. The student is expected to attend class regularly. Repeat: the student is expected to attend class regularly. Absence from class is itself reason for a lower or failing grade. The student is expected to be present in class after having carefully read each class assignment. Each student is expected to set aside sufficient time for regular assignments and to order his life so that he can do the required material. Please expect to do this if you take this course.

 

3) There will be both a midterm on October 10 of the matter studied till that time and a final scheduled examination. Each student will be expected to possess a copy of the assigned book. There will be a Reserve List in the Library of other materials on Aristotle.

 

4) There are seven required books. We will read each of these during the course. The books (in bookstore) are: Aristotle, Ethics and Politics. We will read The Rhetoric and Poetics of Aristotle, Modern Library, Nichols, Citizens and Statesmen, Bodeus, The Political Dimension of Aristotle's Ethics; Leo Strauss, City and Man, and the Issue of The Review of Metaphysics, June, 1996, which contains a symposium on Aristotle's Politics. (This latter journal will be made available through the professor, to be announced in class). The bookstore usually removes these books early in October.

 

5) I will at least mention five books about Aristotle that would be well to read: 1) Henry Veatch, Aristotle, 2) Eric Voegelin's Plato and Aristotle, 3) R. G. Mulgan, Aristotle's Political Theory, 4) Mortimer Adler, Aristotle for Everybody, and 5) Sir Ernest Barker, The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle.

 

6) "The direction of Aristotle to those that study politicks, is, first to examine and understand what has been written by the ancients on government; then to cast their eyes round upon the world, and consider by what causes the prosperity of communities is visibly influenced, and why some are worse, and others better administered.

The same method must be pursued by him who hopes to become eminent in any other part of knowledge. The first task is to search the books, the next to contemplate nature. He must first possess himself of the intellectual treasures which the diligence of former ages has accumulated, and then endeavor to encrease them by his own collections.

The mental disease of the present generation, is impatience of study, contempt of the great masters of ancient wisdom, and a disposition to rely wholly upon unassisted genius and natural sagacity." -- Samuel Johnson, The Rambler, Saturday, September 7, 1751.